A pizza cookbook for the dedicated… which I am not

Note – The Pizza Bible: The World’s Favorite Pizza Styles, from Neapolitan, Deep-Dish, Wood-Fired, Sicilian, Calzones and Focaccia to New York, New Haven, Detroit, and more by Tony Gemignani with Susie Heller and Steve Siegelman was sent to me by Blogging For Books for free to review.  I am not being paid for this post.

Things that I like about The Pizza Bible:  The recipes all sound delicious, and there is a great selection of recipes.  Tony Gemignani obviously loves his craft and it shows in the amount of detail.  There’s a little more than a dozen pizza sauce recipes, and just as many varieties of dough recipes.  I also like the organization of the book.  It’s divided by type of pizzas – regional American, Chicago, Sicilian, Californian, Napoletana, regional Italian, grilled, and a few more thrown in.

The thing I don’t like about this book (and unfortunately I think it’s going to be a deal breaker for me) is that the recipes are quite fiddly and exacting.  I had been craving homemade pizza when I got a copy of this book to review only to be discouraged when I realize that I’d need to plan to make a pizza ahead of time.

One of the dough recipes that appealed to me the most essentially required two days of preparation before the day of cooking… which I had every intention of doing but then my schedule was waylaid by well meaning family members.  In short, I lost my motivation.  Another dough recipe of interest to me required at least 24 hours. (which I still might try).  I’m not unaccustomed to a slow risen dough.  I just wasn’t expecting it.

So, I’m only recommending this book to the pizza die-hards.  At-home cooks who prefer something more approachable may not want this book.  I will probably try give the book another shot in the kitchen, but I mostly suspect that I’ve acquired a new coffee table book.

A pizza cookbook for the dedicated… which I am not